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Even When I Fall

  • Harris Academy South Norwood 2 Cumberlow Avenue London SE25 6AE (map)

Dir. Kate Mclarnon and Sky Neal • 2018 • UK • 93 mins • Cert 12A

Even When I Fall is a feature documentary about Kathmandu Circus, the first and only circus in Nepal, set up by two survivors of child trafficking.  

Sheetal and Saraswoti are Nepalese child trafficking survivors who met as teenagers in a Kathmandu refuge after being rescued from corrupt Indian circuses. As they take the bold step of bringing an unrecognised art form to Nepal, they simultaneously challenge the deep-seated stigma against trafficked women.

This intimate, beautiful film harnesses the visual power of circus to give a unique perspective into the complex world of human trafficking. This is a film about hopes, dreams and inspirational young people who are working against the status quo to create positive change in their own societies.

Followed by a panel discussion with Anna Strickland (Founder, Circus Kathmandu Foundation), Saima Raza (Manager, Croydon Community Against Trafficking), Diane Payne (Programme Development Officer, The Salvation Army) and Debbie Ariyo (CEO, AFRUCA). See below for more information about our partner organisations.


About our partners


Circus Kathmandu Foundation are a registered charity set up to support Circus Kathmandu (the subject of the film Even When I Fall) to empower them to build their own business and use their stories to help keep other young people safe. If you would like to support the work they do, please visit https://www.justgiving.com/circus-kathmandu

Croydon Community Against Trafficking (CCAT) are a coalition of people that seek to raise awareness of modern slavery and trafficking locally and regionally and have been doing so since 2005. They work to campaign against this crime through engaging with communities, local networks, businesses and educational institutions. They consistently work to raise the profile of this issue and gather intelligence to feedback to statutory agencies.

The Salvation Army is an international Christian church and registered charity which has been transforming lives throughout the last 150 years. In 2011 the charity was awarded the Government contract to provide specialist support for adult victims of modern slavery in England and Wales, including safe accommodation, counselling, medical care, translation services and legal counselling. Victims seeking help who have been trafficked to or within England and Wales are referred to the service through a dedicated referral line 0300 303 8151 available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Internationally, The Salvation Army has made a global commitment to fighting modern slavery and human trafficking; an International Anti-Human Trafficking (AHT) Taskforce has been established and across the world the charity runs more than 30 projects aimed at raising awareness of trafficking and slavery, and supporting survivors.

Africans Unite Against Child Abuse (AFRUCA) was established in May 2001 in the aftermath of the deaths of children like Jude Akapa, Victoria Climbie and Damilola Taylor in the UK. The organisation was set up as a platform for advocating for the welfare of African children and has since gained recognition for its role in speaking out on key issues affecting African children in the UK.

The charity has been at the forefront of efforts to denounce the trafficking of African children to the country as well as highlighting the issue of the branding of children as witches or as possessed by evil spirits. It has drawn attention to both phenomena through organising activities, and engaging at different levels with policy-makers, other NGOs and within the African community.